P/R: International volunteer attacked and injured by Israeli army

aprile 14, 2014 at 6:08 am

(segue versione in italiano)

April 14, 2014

At Tuwani – On April 11 an international volunteer was attacked and injured by Israeli army, while coming back from accompanying Palestinian shepherds near Susiya.

The Palestinian village of Susiya is surrounded by the Israeli settlement of Suseya, the outpost of Suseya’s Ancient Synagogue and the military base of Suseya North, where the Palestinian shepherds were nearby grazing. The Palestinian inhabitants of Susiya are struggling through the nonviolent popular resistance in order to gain the right to access their own lands and to live a dignified life.

At 14:10 pm, two international volunteers were leaving the place after having accompanied four Palestinian shepherds to graze on their own lands. They had just got in the stopped car on the street that connects Susiya and Yatta (where two other internationals were waiting for them), when two Israeli soldiers arrived from the military base and intimated them to get out from the car.

While the group was standing near the street, two army vehicles approached. As soon as the second vehicle arrived, the soldiers got immediately out from the jeep. The commander and four more soldiers physically blocked one international and tried to grab his camera, to handcuff him and to put him into the jeep, tugging at him and beating him. In the meanwhile other soldiers blocked the other volunteers, preventing them from taping as best the aggression that lasted for 13 minutes.

Because of the attack, the international volunteer was injured. He had a bleeding wound on his elbow and he received a hard blow on the lower abdomen, whereby the intervention of the ambulance was needed. The soldiers also tried to block the doctors to prevent the injured to get into the ambulance, until the Israeli Police came and gave the permission to leave.

The volunteer attacked was hospitalized in Yatta and the other three were detained in Kiryat Arba Police station and released after five hours. The Police held all the videos of the incident to investigate on it and the three internationals were given expulsion orders from South Hebron Hills area for 14 to 16 days.

Operation Dove has maintained an international presence in At Tuwani and the South Hebron Hills since 2004.

For further information:
Operation Dove, 054 99 25 773

[Note: According to the Fourth Geneva Convention, the Hague Regulations, the International Court of Justice, and several United Nations resolutions, all Israeli settlements and outposts in the Occupied Palestinian Territories are illegal. Most settlement outposts, including Havat Ma'on (Hill 833), are considered illegal also under Israeli law.]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Current
  • email
  • Netvibes
  • Technorati

The Israeli military escort didn’t accompany Palestinian schoolchildren, exposing them to settlers’ attack

aprile 10, 2014 at 6:51 pm

At Tuwani – On April 10 the Israeli military escort didn’t accompany the Palestinian children from Tuba and Maghayir Al Abeed on the way back from school to their villages.

The children reached the meeting point with the military escort at 12:15 pm, the escort was supposed to arrive at 12:30 pm as every Thursday. Where the children wait is a dangerous place, very close to the Israeli settlement of Ma’on and the illegal outpost of Havat Ma’on. Even if International volunteers made different phone calls to the DCL (District Coordination Liaison) and directly to the Israeli army office the escort didn’t arrive. So at 1:20 pm the children decided to reach their homes by a longer path that crosses Palestinian owned lands very close to the south-western side of Havat Ma’on outpost. Because of the danger, International volunteers accompanied the children. At 1:50 pm two young Israeli settlers attacked children and volunteers, throwing rocks with slingshots. The attack lasted about 3 minutes and forced the children to run toward the hills in order to reach the Palestinian village of Tuba.

The misconduct of the Israeli military escort often endangers the Palestinian children whom the soldiers should protect. The schoolchildren were attacked by Israeli settlers also on April 9, while the escort was present: http://tuwaniresiste.operazionecolomba.it/?p=3130

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Current
  • email
  • Netvibes
  • Technorati

P/R: Palestinian schoolchildren attacked by Israeli settlers, in South Hebron Hills

aprile 9, 2014 at 2:06 pm

Military escort misconduct exposes Palestinian children to risk on their way to and from school

(segue versione in italiano)

April 9, 2014

At Tuwani – On April 9, children from the Palestinian villages of Tuba and Maghayir Al Abeed were attacked by settlers coming from the Israeli illegal outpost of Havat Ma’on. The children were walking to school, accompanied by the Israeli military escort that has the duty to protect them everyday on their way to and from school, as established in 2004 by the Children Rights Committee of the Knesset. During the 2013-2014 school year the misconduct this military escort has exposed the children to dangerous risks in numerous occasions.

In order to reach the school in the village of At Tuwani, the Palestinian children coming from the nearby byvillages of Tuba and Maghayir Al Abeed, aged between 6 and 17 years, usually walk through the shortest route, about 20 minutes walking, that passes between the Israeli settlement of Ma’on and the illegal outpost of Havat Ma’on (Hill 833). This route is the main road linking their villages and At Tuwani.

On the morning of April 9 at 7:40 am, two Israeli children coming from the illegal outpost of Havat Ma’on attacked the Palestinian children by trowing them stones with slingshots. Two Palestinian girls, aged 12 and 14, were hit on their legs by the stones and were injured. At the moment of the attack the Israeli soldiers were not walking with the children as they are supposed to, but were all inside the military vehicle, following behind the group of children.

Everyday international volunteers monitor the regular implementation of the IDF escort for an average number of 16 children, aged between 6 and 17 years old, coming from the villages of Tuba and Maghayir al Abeed. August 25 marked the beginning of the school year 2013-2014 and 132 days of school have been recorded so far. The escort was not present in 5 mornings and 6 afternoons, forcing the children to walk a longer and still dangerous path that takes them about one hour to reach the school. During the current school year international volunteers registered that in 30% of the cases the military escort was late (27% during the previous school year 2012-2013), causing children the loss of about 8 hours of lessons (17 in 2012-2013). In addition, in 50% of the cases (52% in 2012-2013) the military escort arrived late after school, forcing the children to wait in a dangerous place (the gathering one), close to both the settlement and the outpost, for a total time of about 12 hours (19 in 2012-2013). In contravention to the escort’s protective mandate, in 96% of the cases (i.e. 127 out of 132 recorded cases in which the escort was present) the Israeli military failed to fully complete the escort and the soldiers did not accompany the children to the end of the established path (78% in 2012-2013). Furthermore thus far in 2013-2014 school year, in 82% (37% in 2012-2013) of the cases the escort didn’t walk with the children, as established in the agreement between the Israel Civil Administration’s District Coordination Office (DCO) and the mayor of At Tuwani.

For further information on the military escort in the past years, it is available the report “The Dangerous Road to Education. Palestinian Students Suffer Under Settler Violence and Military Negligence” at: http://goo.gl/CXfi9

Operation Dove has maintained an international presence in At Tuwani and the South Hebron Hills since 2004.

For further information:
Operation Dove, 054 99 25 773

[Note: According to the Fourth Geneva Convention, the Hague Regulations, the International Court of Justice, and several United Nations resolutions, all Israeli settlements and outposts in the Occupied Palestinian Territories are illegal. Most settlement outposts, including Havat Ma'on (Hill 833), are considered illegal also under Israeli law.]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Current
  • email
  • Netvibes
  • Technorati

Ogni conversazione

aprile 5, 2014 at 5:13 am

…poiché ogni conversazione è una palestra d’amore.

E’ ciò che penso rispetto al relazionarsi a parole con i soldati dell’esercito israeliano.
Quando arriviamo qui come volontari non conosciamo né l’arabo, né i membri di questa comunità, né i loro usi e costumi. Cominciamo in punta di piedi, con delicatezza ad intessere relazioni, attenti a non esagerare ma allo stesso tempo disposti ad aprirci come speriamo loro facciano presto con noi.

Quando arriviamo inizia anche una ricca e complessa vita di gruppo, in cui è necessario lasciarsi essere, lasciar essere l’altro, tenere il passo dell’ultimo e allo stesso tempo non risparmiarsi e far sì che ognuno possa dare il meglio di sé. E’ perfetta una metafora non mia al proposito: gruppo è come mettere tanti sassi appuntiti in un barattolo e ogni giorno scuoterlo, dopo un po’ ci saranno ancora tanti sassi diversi ma con gli angoli decisamente smussati.
Queste relazioni, con il gruppo e con i palestinesi, vivono una crescente empatia e soprattutto fiducia reciproca di chi ogni giorno sceglie di mettere un po’ della propria vita nelle mani dell’altro.
E’ un processo lento che ci richiede energie, riflessioni personali e insieme, continui aggiustamenti… forze che mettiamo in gioco in questa condivisione per il bene che vogliamo ai palestinesi; per far si che quando ci troviamo nei campi o con le pecore o in tante altre situazioni, vi siano la sintonia e la fermezza necessarie ad abbassare il livello della violenza che ci troviamo ad affrontare.
Qui vi è poi un livello più alto di relazione, che è quello con le forze israeliane. Dico più alto non perché queste sono “forze” armate e in divisa, ma perché credo comprenda tutte le relazioni di cui parlavo prima e in più lo sguardo ad un orizzonte molto più ampio, che come Colombe è la pace per palestinesi ed israeliani. I soldati dell’esercito israeliano li incontriamo ogni giorno, e ci dispiace perché creano diversi guai ai palestinesi. In questo conflitto è infatti molto disequilibrata la bilancia della giustizia, per questo motivo noi da anni ci “schieriamo” vivendo ad At-Tuwani.
Viviamo però anche a Gerusalemme ovest per coltivare amicizie israeliane, per mantenere ampio e presente l’orizzonte di pace.
Questi luoghi, e purtroppo questo conflitto, sono dei palestinesi che diventano nostra famiglia, degli israeliani amici sinceri e anche dei soldati israeliani, qui nelle colline a sud di Hebron.
Questo non significa normalizzare, smettere di pensare che loro qui non dovrebbero esserci, smettere di schierarsi con chiarezza dalla parte dell’ingiustizia. Per me significa umanizzarli, grande e difficile frutto di un cammino nonviolento, vedere l’uomo o donna giovane israeliano sotto la divisa e quando è possibile approcciarsi a loro con la stessa delicatezza e voglia di verità che usiamo nelle altre relazioni che intessiamo qui.
Non decontestualizzare ma tener presente che il contesto è grande, non giudicare ma condividere ciò che noi qui abbiamo compreso, rispettando l’altro per la dignità che ha una persona e non ha invece l’arma che porta, raccontare le colline a sud di Hebron e magari anche le amicizie israeliane ma sempre in quanto testimoni anche se molto “impastati”; attenti sempre a tutti i protagonisti di questa storia, che non siamo noi e per i quali stiamo parlando proprio con lui/lei.
Ecco perché tengo a mente che qui ogni conversazione è davvero una palestra d’amore, un allenare il bene che iniziamo a provare per palestinesi ed israeliani e per il loro futuro di pace e convivenza.

S.

 

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Current
  • email
  • Netvibes
  • Technorati

Video: Six shelters demolished by the Israeli forces in the Palestinian village of At Tuwani, South Hebron Hills

aprile 3, 2014 at 2:42 pm

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Current
  • email
  • Netvibes
  • Technorati

P/R: Six shelters demolished by the Israeli forces in the Palestinian village of At Tuwani, South Hebron Hills

aprile 2, 2014 at 4:23 pm

Israeli forces demolished shelters made of concrete used by Palestinians during olive and wheat harvest seasons.

(Segue versione in italiano)

April 2, 2014

At Tuwani – On April 2 the Israeli army together with some Border Police and District Coordination Office (DCO) officers demolished six shelters made of concrete in the Palestinian village of At-Tuwani.

At 9:20 am a convoy made up of one bulldozer, two army Jeeps, three Border Police vehicles, and two DCO cars entered the Palestinian village of Al Mufaqarah. The convoy passed through and reached the hills surrounding the gravel road that connects the Palestinian village of Al Mufaqarah to the village of At Tuwani. The area is Palestinian private land, cultivated with wheat and olive trees. On those fields the Palestinian owners from At-Tuwani in the past three years had built shelters made of concrete, in order to have a backing place during the harvest seasons when Palestinian families work hard for entire days under hot sunbeams.

Under the directions of DCO officers six shelters were demolished by the bulldozer; two of those were already completed and two others still under construction. On March 2, a DCO officer had come to the area and took pictures of the shelters but no demolition order was delivered.

At 10:10 am the convoy left. Palestinian inhabitants of Al Mufaqarah, the owners of the shelters, B’tselem operators and international volunteers were present on the place.

At-Tuwani and Al Mufaqarah villages are located in Area C, under Israeli military and administrative control. That means that all the constructions must be approved by the Israeli administration. Israel denies Palestinians the right to build on the 70 percent of Area C, which is about the 44 percent of all the West Bank, while within the remaining 30 percent a series of restrictions are applied in order to prevent Palestinians from the possibility of obtaining permits (source: OCHA oPt).

While the Palestinian and Bedouin villages of Area C suffer from Israel’s ongoing policy of demolitions and threats, the nearby outposts and settlements continue to expand. The Israeli illegal outpost of Avigayil since three years has been expanding in south-east direction with new houses and a fence that annexes always more Palestinian land. The Israeli illegal outpost of Havat Ma’on is always expanding despite continuos complaints from Israeli activists and International volunteers who fornish proofs of the works. The Israeli settlements of Ma’on and Karmel are expanding in particular since the Israeli government’s planning commitee approved the construction of 5170 new units in West Bank settlements in the spring of 2013. In the beginning of February 2014 a new fence was built around the south-eastern side of Ma’on, annexing even more meters of Palestinian owned land.

Operation Dove has maintained an international presence in At-Tuwani and the South Hebron Hills since 2004.

Pictures of the incident: http://www.operazionecolomba.it/galleries/palestina-israele/2014/2014-04-02-six-shelters-demolished-by-the-israeli-forces-in-the-palestinian-village-of-at-tuwani-south-hebron-hills/
Video of the incident: available soon on www.tuwaniresiste.operazionecolomba.it

For further information:
Operation Dove, 054 99 25 773

[Note: According to the Fourth Geneva Convention, the Hague Regulations, the International Court of Justice, and several United Nations resolutions, all Israeli settlements and outposts in the Occupied Palestinian Territories are illegal. Most settlement outposts, including Havat Ma'on (Hill 833), are considered illegal also under Israeli law.]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Current
  • email
  • Netvibes
  • Technorati

QUANDO I PALESTINESI INSEGNANO LA NONVIOLENZA

aprile 1, 2014 at 5:22 am

Storia di un villaggio che fa la differenza.

 

At Tuwani è un villaggio di quattrocento anime sulle colline a sud di Hebron, nel profondo sud della Cisgiordania. Questo paesino con i suoi abitanti dal carattere testardo è la porta d’accesso all’area denominata Masafer Yatta (la circoscrizione di Yatta): 15 villaggi, 1400 persone in tutto, la metà delle quali minorenni. La regione si estende fino al deserto (il Negev o Naqab). La particolarità di tutta questa zona non sono certo i paesaggi mozzafiato, bensì l’assenza del muro. E non è che se lo sono dimenticato. Il muro non c’è perché nei piani non troppo velati del governo israeliano potrebbe esser costruito un po’ più a nord, inglobando l’area di Masafer Yatta. Il vero ostacolo? Gli abitanti, appunto.
Il villaggio di At Tuwani si trova in piena area C, sotto controllo civile e militare israeliano. Qui l’Autorità Palestinese non ha alcun potere e le colonie proliferano contro ogni convenzione internazionale. Secondo l’OCHA (Office for Civilian and Humanitarian Affairs), un’agenzia dell’ONU, sono circa 350 mila i coloni israeliani che vivono in Cisgiordania (Gerusalemme Est e Alture del Golan escluse). Nell’area di Masafer Yatta la colonizzazione è cominciata nel 1982 e da allora si è notevolmente intensificata. Esistono qui due tipi di insediamento: le colonie vere e proprie, dichiarate illegali dalla Quarta Convenzione di Ginevra nonché da innumerevoli risoluzioni dell’ONU, ma legali secondo il diritto israeliano e incoraggiate dallo stato ebraico; e gli avamposti, illegali per la stessa legge israeliana. Negli avamposti, embrioni di future città, vivono generalmente i coloni più estremisti, mossi dall’ideologia nazional-religiosa della riconquista delle terre di Giudea e Samaria. Non è raro che tirino fuori una Bibbia se si chiede loro un atto di proprietà della terra. Il fatto di istallarsi nei Territori Occupati non comporta per questa gente nessun vantaggio economico, com’è il caso, invece, per gli abitanti delle colonie ordinarie. Anzi, spesso gli abitanti degli avamposti vivono peggio dei Palestinesi dei villaggi vicini: in container, senza vere case, senza acqua, senza una rete elettrica, con la pastorizia come unica risorsa economica.
At Tuwani si trova in una delle zone più povere e marginalizzate della Cisgiordania, vicinissmo ad una colonia e ad un avamposto. E’ un villaggio di pastori e contadini che quindici anni fa si sono organizzati per reagire all’occupazione israeliana. La loro è una lotta quotidiana ai soprusi, contro gli abusi, gli stenti. “It’s an ongoing struggle”, come direbbe H., presidente del Comitato popolare delle colline a sud di Hebron e abitante di Tuwani: è una continua lotta.
Un tempo nel villaggio vivevano circa seicento persone. Tra il 1997 e il 1999 il governo israeliano ordina l’evacuazione dell’intera area e la deportazione di tutti i suoi abitanti a sud della ByPass Road 317 (la strada ad uso esclusivo degli Israeliani che segna il confine tra area C e area A). Non ha fatto però i conti con la ferma opposizione degli abitanti di At Tuwani che, dopo sei mesi di duro lavoro con associazioni israelo-palestinesi come Yesh Din, i Ta’ayyush, i Rabbini per i diritti umani, o ancora Bet’Selem, riescono ad ottenere uno storico risultato in tribunale: nel 1999 l’Alta Corte Israeliana proclama il diritto di queste persone a vivere nell’area. Viene riconosciuto il diritto alla proprietà delle terre (molte famiglie hanno atti di proprietà che risalgono all’Impero ottomano) e la natura sedentaria della vita nella zona.
Non tutti sono tornati, i villaggi non si sono mai ripopolati come prima. La gente aveva paura. Z. mi ha raccontato di quando l’hanno cacciata da casa sua: in piena notte, con le bombe sonore, le armi, le jeep. Le hanno ucciso un fratello sedicenne. Morto martire, come si dice da queste parti. Molte famiglie contano almeno un “martire”, morto sotto il fuoco israeliano.
Forse la logica è quella, come si dice dalle nostre parti, del meglio pochi ma buoni. Coloro che sono tornati hanno fatto passi da gigante. Certi coloni girano con l’M16 a tracolla e lanciano pietre? Gli abitanti di Tuwani hanno deciso di provare un’altra strada: hanno smesso di rispondere alle pietre con le pietre. Le autorità israeliane non danno i permessi per costruire la scuola? Gli abitanti di Tuwani se la sono costruita di notte. Di giorno ci lavoravano solo le donne, ché le leve israeliane (tutti giovani tra i diciotto e i ventun anni) ci pensano due volte prima di aggredire fisicamente una donna.
Di notte lavorano gli uomini. Il pozzo dello sheykh, il “saggio” del villaggio, era stato distrutto dai soldati e lo sheykh arrestato. Ebbene, durante la notte abitanti da tutti i villaggi della zona sono venuti a ricostruirlo e quando il Saggio è uscito di prigione ed è tornato a casa il suo pozzo era lì ad aspettarlo.
Tante storie, mille voci. Ancor più incredibili se si pensa che sono le storie di contadini, pastori, gente semplice. Le donne non lavorano, sono in gran parte analfabete. Il direttore della scuola è forse l’unica persona a leggere il giornale nel villaggio.
Eppure queste persone hanno fatto come Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Mandela. Sono partiti da una considerazione pratica: la violenza quotidiana e le ingiustizie sono dolorose ma rispondere con pari violenza e ingiustizia è stupido e inutile, anche se da un certo punto di vista forse legittimo. Molti di loro si considerano legittimati a rispondere alla violenza con la violenza, avendone viste davvero di tutti i colori.
Dall’inizio degli anni ’80 (costruzione della colonia di Ma’on) e ancor più dal 2000 in poi (quando è stato fondato l’avamposto illegale di Havat Ma’on, a soli cento metri dal villaggio) è un susseguirsi di sofferenze: pozzi avvelenati, bestie uccise, ulivi tagliati, bambini attaccati lungo la strada per andare a scuola. O semplicemente ciliegi (ciliegi!) coltivati nel campo della colonia più visibile dal villaggio, quando nel villaggio l’acqua è un bene prezioso. Così, senza saper nemmeno chi fossero Gandhi, Martin Luther King e Nelson Mandela, gli abitanti di Tuwani hanno scelto la nonviolenza. Un lungo cammino su un sentiero infinito. Hanno fondato il primo Comitato di resistenza popolare nonviolenta della Cisgiordania.
Ne esistono molti altri, nella valle del Giordano, nel campo profughi di Al-Masara, e non smettono di crescere. Oggi hanno un coordinamento, una strategia comune, un’idea chiara in testa: fosse anche solo in termini pratici, la nonviolenza paga molto, ma molto più della violenza. Attraverso training organizzati e gestiti dagli uomini e dalle donne di Tuwani, tutti i villaggi dell’area sono stati coinvolti in questo grande progetto. H., presidente del Comitato di At Tuwani, non si stanca mai di raccontare la storia del suo villaggio. E’ un uomo fiero e sorridente. La sua filosofia di vita è la speranza: dice che il giorno in cui i suoi compatrioti perderanno la speranza, l’occupazione avrà già vinto. Lui di Gandhi, Martin Luther King e Mandela non sapeva proprio niente. Quando poi ha scoperto che cosa avevano fatto i grandi leader della nonviolenza nel mondo si è detto, stupito, che lui e tutti gli abitanti di At Tuwani avevano fatto, senza saperlo, le stesse cose.
Oggi At Tuwani è l’unico villaggio dell’area ad avere l’acqua corrente, pagata, ovviamente, alla colonia. Esiste una rete elettrica dal 2010, grazie al faticoso collegamento alla rete di Yatta, inizialmente ostacolato dalle autorità israeliane. A Tuwani oggi c’è una moschea, dove ogni venerdì arrivano, sui loro asini o a piedi, gli uomini degli altri villaggi. A Tuwani c’è venuto Tony Blair, il Primo Ministro dell’Autorità Palestinese (di Fatah), ci sono venuti pure i Grillini lo scorso luglio, durante un “viaggio di conoscenza” in Cisgiordania. La gente ci viene e ascolta la storia che questo villaggio ha da raccontare. Impossibile metterci un simbolo : il Comitato si vuole indipendente, auto-organizzato, auto-gestito.
L’esperienza di At Tuwani e degli altri villaggi membri del Comitato restituisce ai Palestinesi un senso di dignità. Non si tratta più di povere vittime o di pericolosi terroristi: queste persone fanno resistenza. Ma non vogliono veder le colonie e gli avamposti svanire nel nulla, vogliono poter vivere in pace coi coloni. Tanti, negli ultimi trent’anni, sono nati nelle colonie. Gli abitanti di At Tuwani vogliono solo che questi figli, come i loro figli, possano, finalmente, crescere in pace.
una volontaria di Operazione Colomba

 

Pubblicato su: http://www.altd.it/2014/03/09/at-tuwani-palestina-non-violenza/

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Current
  • email
  • Netvibes
  • Technorati

March 30: Land Day

marzo 30, 2014 at 6:21 pm

On 30 March 1976, thousands of people belonging to the Palestinian minority in Israel gathered to protest Israeli government plans to expropriate 60,000 dunams of Arab-owned land in West Bank. In the resulting confrontations with Israeli police, six Palestinians were killed, hundreds wounded, and hundreds jailed. In the intervening years, those events have become consecrated in the Palestinian memory as Land Day.

After years of military rule and political docility, Land Day 1976 was the first act of mass resistance by the Palestinians inside Israel against the israeli policy of expansion of the land.

In the Palestinian village of At Tuwani the South Hebron Hills Popular Commitee organised a nonviolen action that consisted in planting olive trees in front of the Israeli settlemen of Ma’on and the Israeli illegal outpost of Havat Ma’on. The Commitee was joined by 30 students from Yatta University, toghether with professors and the principal. The action took place around 11 am and at 11:50 am an army jeep arrived on the place. Four soldiers prevented Palestinians from getting close to the fence that protects cherry trees fields. This land is Palestinian owned, but was cultivated by settlers with cherry trees since the creation of the Israeli outpost in the year 2000.

30 marzo: Giorno della Terra

Il 30 marzo 1976, milioni di persone appartenenti alla minoranza palestinese in Israele si sono runite per protestare contro il piano del governo israeliano di espropriare 60,000 dunams (1 dunam sono 1000 metri quadri) di terrenno di proprietà palestinese in Cisgiordania. Come risultato degli scontri con la polizia, sei palestinesi rimasero uccisi, centinai feriti, e centinaia incarcerati. Negli anni a venire, questi eventi sono stati ricordati nella memoria palestinese con il Giorno della Terra.

Dopo anni di legge militare e docilità politica, il Giorno della Terra 1976 è stato il primo atto di protesta di massa da parte dei palestinesi in territorio israeliano contro la politica israeliana di espansione del territorio.

Nel villaggio di At Tuwani il Comitato Popolare delle Colline a Sud di Hebron ha organizzato un’azione nonviolenta piantando alberi d’ulivo di fronte alla colonia israeliana di Ma’on e all’avamposto illegale di Havat Ma’on. Al Comitato si sono aggiunti 30 studenti dell’Università di Yatta, insieme ai loro professori e al preside. L’azione è iniziata alle 11 e alle 11:50 è arrivata sul posto una camionetta dell’esercito israeliano. Quattro soldati hanno impedito ai palestinesi di avvicinarsi alla rete che protegge campi di ciliegi. Questa terra è di proprietà palestinese, ma è stata coltivata con alberi di ciliege dai coloni israeliani da quando nel 2000 è sorto l’avamposto.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Current
  • email
  • Netvibes
  • Technorati

P/R: South Hebron hills: Palestinian basic resources damaged by Israeli settlers

marzo 29, 2014 at 11:33 am

Settlers from Israeli illegal outposts damaged Palestinian’s solar panels and cultivated lands

(segue versione in italiano)

March 28, 2014

At Tuwani – In the evening of March 26, Israeli settlers damaged some solar panels, only electricity power sources for the Palestinian village Bir Al Idd. The same day, during the early afternoon, Israeli settlers grazed their flock on Palestinian-owned wheat fields, damaging the harvest.

At 2.18 pm International volunteers noticed a flock grazing on Palestinian-owned fields in  Kharrouba valley, close to the south-west side of the Israeli illegal outpost Havat Ma’on, in the South Hebron hills. The flock was apparently unattended, until when, after ten minutes, an Israeli settler from the outpost got close the herd and walked away with it. Later, the Palestinian owners reported the facts to the Israeli police. At 3.02 pm the police arrived at the place and questioned Palestinians and International volunteers, taking from them pictures of the Israeli settler while he was grazing the flock. After that, the police officers went inside the outpost.

Around 6 pm, Israeli settlers damaged photovoltaic system that supplies power to the Palestinian village of Bir Al Idd (South Hebron hills area), hitting it repeatedly. Near the village are located the Israeli illegal outposts of Mitzpe Yair and Nof Nesher. The morning after, Comet-Me members, who placed the system during the 2010 (Comet-Me is an Israeli-Palestinian no-profit organization specialized in providing sustainable energy sources and drinking water systems to isolated communities) arrived on the place in order to verify the damages. At 9:59 am an Israeli policeman and a soldier reached them in order to carry out surveys and listen the testimony of a Palestinian. Later, the complaint of the Palestinian was formalized.

During the late 90s , the Palestinian families of Bir Al Idd were forced to leave the area because of the continuos violence of Israeli settlers. After a Rabbis for Human Rights’ appeal submitted to the Israeli High Court of Justice, on January 2009 the Bir Al Idd residents’ return was allowed.
Now only one household of the 50 residents lives permanently in the village; the others were forced to leave because of several violences that took place since April 2013. In April, August and November 2013, Israeli settlers from Mitzpe Yair attempted to block the only access road to the village. On January 2014, two Israeli settlers prevented Palestinian residents from reaching the village, threatening them.


Since the Palestinian family remained the only one in the village, it has been victim of daily violence by the Israeli settlers from the illegal outposts of Mitzpe Yair and Nof Nesher.

Operation Dove has maintained an international presence in At-Tuwani and the South Hebron Hills since 2004.

For further information about the incident in Bir al Idd: comet-me.org

Pictures of the incident: http://www.operazionecolomba.it/galleries/palestina-israele/2014/2014-03-28-south-hebron-hills-primary-palestinian-resources-damaged-by-israeli-settlers/

For further information:
Operation Dove, 054 99 25 773

[Note: According to the Fourth Geneva Convention, the Hague Regulations, the International Court of Justice, and several United Nations resolutions, all Israeli settlements and outposts in the Occupied Palestinian Territories are illegal. Most settlement outposts, including Havat Ma'on (Hill 833), are considered illegal also under Israeli law.]

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Current
  • email
  • Netvibes
  • Technorati

Local traditions festival

marzo 24, 2014 at 1:42 pm

On March 24 Palestinian families and kids coming from the villages of At Tuwani, Ar Rakeez, Al Mufaqarah, Tuba, Maghayir Al Abeed and Susiya gathered at the school of At Tuwani to celebrate local traditions.

Dabke dance

Traditional song and dresses

The Freedoom Theatre performing

Share and Enjoy:
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Google Bookmarks
  • Current
  • email
  • Netvibes
  • Technorati